Stringer and his kids ride fake MTA bus in new campaign ad

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Bus-ted!

Mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer appeared to fake a city bus ride with his two son for his latest ad — getting aboard a defunct model labeled “M14D” in Brooklyn even though that route is actually miles away in Manhattan.

“I thought I could show Max and Miles some of the reasons I’m running for mayor,” Stringer says at the outset of the 30-second spot, before a montage of the three taking in the sights and sounds of the city via bus, subway and taxi.

The clip shows Stringer and sons boarding at the B25 bus stop in Brooklyn. But as the bus pulls out, it’s labeled “M14D” — a route that runs across 14th street and down Avenue D in Manhattan.

In fact, the bus Stringer’s riding is a class — the RTS Nova — that hasn’t run in-service, subway conductor Max Diamond tweeted.

“This whole scene is 100% staged on a chartered bus,” Diamond posted.

Mayoral candidate Scott Stringer and his sons boarding the bus in the campaign ad.
Mayoral candidate Scott Stringer and his sons boarding the bus in the campaign ad.
Scott Stringer for Mayor
Stringer and his sons go for the ride in Brooklyn despite this particular route being in Manhattan.
Stringer and his sons go for the ride in Brooklyn despite this particular route being in Manhattan.
Scott Stringer for Mayor
The model of bus also isn't currently used in service.
The model of bus also isn’t currently used in service.
Scott Stringer for Mayor
The campaign ad errors were pointed out online by subway conductor Max Diamond.
The campaign ad errors were pointed out online by subway conductor Max Diamond.
Scott Stringer for Mayor

A rep for Stringer’s campaign declined to comment, but an MTA source said the authority did not rent or loan any buses for the ad and were not notified of any filming by the campaign on mass transit.

Film productions typically request permission to film on in-service buses, the source said, and do so under MTA supervision.

The last of the gas-guzzling Rapid Transit Series buses retired two years ago after more than four decades on New York City streets, according to an MTA press release from 2019.



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